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Posts from the ‘Scripture’ Category

18
Sep

Towards healing and repenting of the historic patriarchy of the Christian faith

Miranda N. Pillay, senior lecturer at the University of the Western Cape, offers a re-reading of Luke 4:39-9:51 and through an exploration of the silent narratives in the text offers a response to the call to  call “to repent of the historic patriarchy of our faith”. Read more »

18
Sep

Talking and Listening in the Anglican Communion

Kojo Okyere, Department of Religion and Human Values University of Cape Coast reads Proverbs 18:13 in Ghanaian Life and Thought and offers reflections for the Anglican Communion.

INTRODUCTION

The Ghanaian society, like many other African societies, is blessed with precious sayings which constitute nuggets of wisdom.  Proverbs and other similar traditions are used by Ghanaians to communicate a message deemed to have some kind of mystical truth because of their appeal to the ancestors or elders.  Read more »

18
Sep

Collection for the Saints in Jerusalem

Rev Robinson Kariuki Mwangi Deputy Principle of St Andrew’s College, Kabare, Kenya draws a A paradigm for church partnership in the 21st century from the Biblical accounts of the monies collected for the saints in Jerusalem. 

Introduction

This paper attempts to highlight the historical setting, rationale and outcome of the collection for the Jerusalem church. It will further explore at length a paradigm of partnership in the Pauline letters at both the spiritual and economic levels, and what this might imply for the 21st century church, presently at the point of schism. Read more »

18
Sep

Struggle for Power and Conflict Resolution in the Bible

Charles A. Mwihambi is an Assistant Lecturer at St. John’s University Tanzania, Msalato Theological College in the Diocese of Central Tanganyika. This article is a Study of David’s Succession in 1 Kings in Relation to the Ongoing Conflicts in the Anglican Communion Read more »

18
Sep

Models of Conflict Resolution from the Pentateuch and the ANE

Dr. Zebedi A. Muga from St Paul’s University, Limuru, explores aspects of Pentateuchal Indaba and resolutions from selected readings of the Pentateuch and the ANE

Introduction

This paper seeks to examine aspects of resolving intra-person and inter-communal conflicts based on readings from the Pentateuch. This is intended to inform the Indaba listening process of the Anglican Communion through analysis of certain readings that are hoped will shed light on the process from a biblical perspective. Read more »

18
Sep

The Philippian Model

In examining the relationships of the Apostle Paul to the congregations in Rome and Philippi, the Rev. Canon Phil Groves elucidates some key elements of a partnership.  His assertion is that most inter-Communion relationships were begun in a donor/receiver or superior/subordinate definition.  This, he argues, is neither biblical nor healthy and the members of the Communion should follow Paul’s lead in Philippi.

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18
Sep

Local vs. Global Church

Fr. George Okoth Acting Dean of the School of Theology and Religious Studies at St. John’s University of Tanzania reflects on how the current situation in the Anglican Communion has theologically, politically, and socio-economically affected local parishes’ ability to deal with serious disagreements about theological Issues.  What role does the interpretation of scripture play in disagreements in my home parish Sakawa – Tanzania, in the Anglican Communion?  What are my initial thoughts about a way forward? How useful are the Apostle Paul’s epistles for churches in a time of conflict?  Read more »

18
Feb

Peace, Not as the World Gives by C.B. Peter

C.B. Peter is Senior lecturer in Old Testament Studies at Saint Paul’s University, Limuru, Kenya. He reflects here on Biblical Models for Conflict Resolution.

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18
Feb

Humility in the context of conflict

Canon Ernest Ndahani, lecturer at St Philips Kongwa, reflects on Philippians 2:1-11 and the connection between humility and unity. 

Introduction

The often-cited proverbial phrase “I am because we are; and since we are, therefore I am” was formulated by John Mbiti[1] and its huge influence led to the realization of the African Philosophical tradition.  In this tradition the identity of an individual is never separable from the socio-cultural environment.  If individual identity is grounded in the life of community, then that individual’s good life is inseparable from the successful functioning of his or her society.  Hence, in this philosophical tradition, ethics and moral reflection tend to focus much more on the collective structure than on individual decision making.[2]  It is from this understanding, I suppose, that we can think of the church as being called to the ministry within itself in order to fulfill its ministry to the world.  In the words of Morgan, “the measure in which the Church is composed of men and women, who are living the life of reconciliation, is the measure in which the Church is declaring the evangel of reconciliation to the world.”[3]  With reference to this thinking we are going to look closely on Paul’s exhortation to harmony and humility in the face of conflict (Php. 2:1-4) and his illustration of the supreme example (Php. 2:5-11). Read more »

18
Jul

The Bible and Polygamy in Tanzania

Rev. Mote Magomba, Tanzania, reflects on “ordinary readers” versus Academic Interpretations of Scripture in Interpreting the Bible in a Context of Polygamy in Tanzania

Introduction

This article presents a scriptural interpretative conflict between ordinary readers of the Bible and academic readers of the Bible.  Using a case study from the Anglican Diocese of Ruaha, Iringa, Tanzania, the writer suggests constructive theological ways to resolve the conflict.  Through his case study and the discussions therein, the writer implicitly attempts to develop a theory to deal with other issues of biblical interpretative conflicts emerging locally and globally in the Anglican Communion.  Academic interpreters of the Bible, if they are to be relevant to their respective contexts and people, have to consciously take into account the resources and strategies of ordinary readers of the Bible.  By “readers” of the Bible, we mean those who have the habit of reading the Bible and interpreting it to their daily ordinary lives.  In this article the term “readers” has been put into invented commas because throughout this paper it is used both literally and metaphorically.  That is, some readers of the Bible can literally read the Bible. Read more »

15
Jun

Indaba and Scripture

This is an extract from Archbishop Thabo Makgoba’s talk at a USPG conference in 2010. The Full text can be found here.

Indaba

Indaba is not about trying to make everyone into Amazulu, nor about transplanting elements from one culture into a completely foreign and inappropriate context. I also know that Indaba is far from perfect – it is not always conducted inclusively, and it can be abused by leaders intent on getting their own way. But at its best, there is a great deal that is readily susceptible to the sort of ‘baptism’ of which I spoke earlier. Let me explain:

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31
May

Flight – Beginning of the Listening Process

Conflicts in our communities and church lead some into flight. Emily Onyango offers a theological reflection on Hagar and Sarah. Hagar’s flight led her to an encounter with God and ultimately a return. The story and reflection has profound meanings for all of us.

A study of the encounter between Hagar and Sarah

The Revd Dr Emily Awino Onyango, Senior Lecturer in Historical Studies, St. Paul’s University, Limuru, Kenya

Listening to God is the foundation and starting point of all listening processes. As we listen to God, we have an opportunity for self-reflection and evaluation, and also listen to others. In Genesis 16, we reflect on the story between Sarah and Hagar. Hagar is fleeing from a conflict situation, and in the process she encounters the angel of the Lord [1]. In this encounter between God and Hagar, God listens to Hagar. Hagar also listens to what God has to say about her situation as she reflects on the way forward. This story is very useful in reflecting on the situation within the Anglican Communion. Several issues are raised within the text which is similar. Read more »