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Posts from the ‘Mission’ Category

18
Sep

The Mission of God and the Anglican Tradition

In this extract from his 2011 book Saving Power: The Mission of God and the Anglican Communion former General Secretary of USPG (now Us) Bishop Michael Doe reflects on mission and unity.

THE MISSIO DEI (1)

The “Missio Dei” or “Mission of God” is God’s self-revelation as the One who loves the world and is actively involved in and with the world, it embraces both church and world, and the church is privileged to be called to participate in God’s mission. Or in the words of the last century’s great missiologist, David Bosch: “To participate in mission is to participate in the movement of God’s love toward people, since God is a fountain of sending love”.(2) Read more »

18
Sep

Mission in a Context of Poverty

The Revd. Mote Magomba, Anglican Church of Tanzania,  speaks out against institutional or structural sin.  Pointing out that the situation of those who live in abject poverty is not God’s ideal, he goes on to say that being rich is not, in itself, sinful.  The rich who do not care for their fellow human beings, sharing the wealth they have that is a gift from God, are the true sinners.  Only through penitence and humility on the parts of both sides can the Kingdom of God ever be truly instituted and the mission of the Church fulfilled. Read more »

18
Sep

The Impact Of Economic Realities On The Mission Of The Church

The Rev. Canon Phanuel L. Mung’ong’o,Msalato Theological College, Dodoma, Tanzania,  examines the sources of inter-Christian conflict both locally and abroad.  He argues that the majority of disagreements are based, either obviously or not, on economic inequalities.  Rather that argue a “Leveler” program, Canon Mung’ong’o  insists that the Church must turn its attention away from the enticements of the material world and focus instead on the Missio Dei, the Mission of God, as exemplified by the life and teachings of Jesus Christ. Read more »

18
Sep

Religious Fundamentalism and Christian Witnesss in a Pluralistic Context

The Rev Dr. Mani Chacko, Director of the Ecumenical Christian Centre in Bangalore, reflects on mission in the context of violence and fundamentalism in India. 

Introduction

The jungle district of Kandhamal witnessed the worst anti-Christian violence and persecution in Indian history following the 23 August 2008 murder of Swami Lakshmanananda Saraswati. The Hindu leader had led a vociferous campaign against Christianity for decades in the Kandhamal district of the south-central state of Orissa. Though Maoist rebels claimed responsibility for the murder, Hindu fundamentalist groups alleged that the murder was a “Christian conspiracy” and hounded out the Christians while the state administration did little to stop the carnage. In the widespread violence that continued unabated for weeks, more than 90 Christians were killed. Over 6,000 Christian houses and 350 churches and Christian institutions were looted and torched. Over 54,000 Christians fled their homes. Read more »